Syllabus for: HISTCIV
Course Title: History of Civilizations
Prerequisite:  None
Prerequisite to: None
Type of Course: Basic Course
 

Description

A survey of the history of Eastern and Western civilizations from the earliest times to the present, tracing the growth and influence of ideas, institutions, power relationships, and major political, economic and social movements.

Objectives

  1. Recognize primary historical facts from the beginning of human history to the present.
  2. Evaluate a diversity of interpretations to explain why the world turned out the way it has.
  3. Assess issues of change and continuity over time.
  4. Explain the nature of history as interplay of disciplines.
  5. Enhance the ability to put ideas and values in historical context.
  6. Develop critical thinking among the students through historical analysis.

Teaching Strategies

  1. Lecture and discussion of reading assignments.
  2. Group analysis of issues in world history to be followed by sharing sessions where each group will report its conclusions to the rest of the class.
  3. Debates over significant historical controversies.
  4. Panel discussion of historical issues.
  5. Viewing of films about important personages, events or periods in history.
  6. Independent research.

  Requirements

  1. Mid-Term/Final Exams
  2. Individual Papers
  3. Group Projects/Activities i.e. debates, panel discussions, etc.
  4. Quizzes
  5. Recitation

Grading System  

  1. Mid-Term Exam                                                              25%
  2. Final Exam                                                                       25%
  3. Individual Papers/Group Projects                                      20%
  4. Recitation/ Panel Discussion                                              20%                                        
  5. Quizzes                                                                            10%

_____

     Total                                                                              100%

Textbook

McNeill, William H. A World History 4th Edition, New York: Oxford University Press, 1999

Course Outline and Schedule of Discussions

 

Session

Objectives

Topics

Teaching Strategies

Method of Evaluation

Text/

Materials

I.  Introduction to the Course

1st Week

- Explain the general objectives of the course, class requirements and grading system.

- Discuss the relevance of history, historical methodology, periodization and the different approaches to the study of the past.   

- Refresh the memory of world geography.

1.      Classroom Policies & Grading System

 

2.      Historiography & Periodization

 

3.      World Geography

Lecture-Discussion

Recitation

 

 

 

Active Participation

Syllabus

 

 

“Studying History”, AP World History, 2004, pp. 33-41

 

 

World Map

II.  Emergence and Definition of the Major Old World Civilizations to 500 B.C.

2nd - 4th Weeks

- Present the latest theories on the origins of man and beginnings of human history.

- Emphasize the developments that led to the rise of civilizations.

-  Stress the distinctive civilized styles of life in the ancient world.

- Describe the role of “barbarians” in the civilizing process and their relationship with civilized societies.

1.      Origins of Man and the Rise of Civilizations

 

2.      Cosmopolitanism in the Middle East

 

3.      Indian, Greek & Chinese Civilizations

 

4.      “Barbarian” World

Lecture-Discussion

 

Group Activity

 

Film Viewing

(Options)

 

“Ultimate Survivor”

 

“Early Civilization”

v.1

 

“Empires of the Ancient World"

v.2

Introspective Papers

 

 

 

Group Project

 

 

 

Quizzes

 

 

 

Recitation

Chapters 1 & 2

 

 

Chapter 3

 

 

 

Chapters 4,5 & 6

 

 

 

Chapter 7

III.  Equilibrium Among the Civilizations 500 B.C. – A.D. 1500

5th -7th Weeks

- Emphasize the autonomy of each of the ancient civilizations.

- Elucidate how the relationship between the ancient civilizations can be described as equilibrium.

- Discuss how the “Classical Age” of civilizations disturbed the equilibrium.

- Highlight the legacies of the ancient world.

- Explain the impact of “barbarian” invasions.

1.      Classical Age in the East & the West

 

2.      “Barbarian” Invasions & Civilized Response

 

3.      Islamic World, China, India & Europe

 

4.      Medieval Period

 

5.      Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa & the Americas

Lecture-Discussion

 

Sharing Sessions

 

Film Viewing

(Options)

 

“Greece: a Moment of Excellence”

 

“Roman Blood Sport”

 

“China Dynasties of Power”

 

“World’s Great Religions”

 

“Regional Civilization”

v. 3

Introspective Papers

 

 

 

Panel Discussion

 

 

 

Quizzes

 

 

 

Recitation

Chapters

8, 9, 10 & 11

 

Chapter 12

 

 

 

 

Chapters 13 & 14

 

 

Chapter 15 & 16

 

Chapter 17

 

 

MID TERM EXAM

IV.  The Dominance of the West 1500-1789

8th -10th Weeks

- Explain the transition to modern times.

-  Emphasize the significant transformations in the West that affected the rest of the world.

- Describe how the rest of the world responded to the Western challenge.

1.      Age of Exploration & the Rise of Europe

 

2.      Russia & the Americas

 

3.      Reactions of other Civilizations to European Dominance

 

 

Discussion

 

Debate

 

 

Film Viewing

(Options)

 

“Early Modern Times”

v.4

Introspective Papers

 

 

 

Participation in Debate

 

 

 

Quizzes

 

 

Recitation

Chapters 18, 19 & 23

 

 

Chapters 20 & 24

 

Chapters 21, 22, & 25

 

V. The Onset of Global Cosmopolitanism 1789-Present

11th -14th Weeks

-  Explain the impact and consequences of the industrial and democratic revolutions.

- Discuss the onset of globalization.

- Focus on 20th century issues and problems.

1.         Democracy and Industrialism

 

2.         Reactions   to Industrialism & Democracy 1850-1945

 

3.         Post-Colonialism

 

4.         The World at War, 1914-1945

 

5.         The World Since 1945

Lecture-Discussion

 

Symposium

 

Individual

Reporting

 

Film Viewing

(Options)

 

“Enlightenment and Revolution

v.5

 

“Industrialism and a New Global Age”

v.6

 

“World Wars and Revolution”

v.7

 

“The World Today”

v.8

Introspective Papers

 

 

 

Individual Reports

 

 

 

Quizzes

 

 

 

Recitation

Chapter 26

 

 

Chapter 27

 

 

 

 

Chapter 29

 

 

Chapter 30